Suicide prevention hotline

Chances are, you will be affected by suicide at some point in your life. A friend or family member may contemplate or even attempt suicide. It’s important to know the facts about suicide, recognize risk factors, and utilize the many suicide prevention resources that are available.

Suicide Statistics USA

  • Depression affects 20-25% of Americans ages 18+ in a given year. (CDC)
  • The highest suicide rates in the US are among Whites, American Indians, and Alaska Natives.
  • Only half of all Americans experiencing an episode of major depression receive treatment. (NAMI)
  • 80% – 90% of people that seek treatment for depression are treated successfully using therapy and/or medication. (TADS study)
  • Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the US for all ages. (CDC)
  • Approximately 123 Americans die by suicide every day. (CDC)
  • There is 1 death by suicide in the US every 12 minutes. (CDC)
  • Over 44,965 Americans die by suicide every year. (CDC)
  • An estimated quarter-million people each year become suicide survivors (AAS).
  • There is one suicide for every estimated 25 suicide attempts. (CDC)
  • There is one suicide for every estimated 4 suicide attempts in the elderly. (CDC)

Increased Risk of Suicide

suicide prevention resources
  • Prior suicide attempt(s)
  • Family history of suicide
  • Family history of child maltreatment
  • History of alcohol and drug abuse
  • Mental disorders, particularly depression and other mood disorders
  • Access to lethal means
  • Knowing someone who died by suicide
  • Social isolation
  • Chronic disease and disability
  • Lack of access to behavioral health care
  • Feelings of hopelessness
  • Impulsive or aggressive tendencies
  • Cultural and religious beliefs (e.g., belief that suicide is a noble resolution of a personal dilemma)
  • Local epidemics of suicide
  • Isolation, a feeling of being cut off from other people
  • Barriers to accessing mental health treatment
  • Physical illness and physical pain
  • Easy access to lethal methods
  • Unwillingness to seek help because of the stigma attached to mental health and substance abuse disorders or to suicidal thoughts

Certain stressful events can increase the likelihood of suicide. Examples include:

  • End of a relationship or marriage
  • Death of a loved one
  • An arrest
  • Serious financial problems

Resources for Suicide Prevention

There are a surprising number of resources available for suicide prevention and support of those who are suicidal or who have lost someone to suicide. We encourage you to take advantage of these resources.

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

We can all help prevent suicide. The Lifeline provides 24/7, free and confidential support for people in distress, prevention and crisis resources for you or your loved ones, and best practices for professionals. 1-800-273-8255

24/7 Crisis Hotline: National Suicide Prevention Lifeline Network
www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org
1-800-273-TALK (8255) (Veterans, press 1)

Crisis Text Line
Text TALK to 741-741 to text with a trained crisis counselor from the Crisis Text Line for free, 24/7

Veterans Crisis Line
Send a text to 838255

Vets4Warriors

SAMHSA Treatment Referral Hotline (Substance Abuse)
1-800-662-HELP (4357)

RAINN National Sexual Assault Hotline
1-800-656-HOPE (4673)

National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline
1-866-331-9474

The Trevor Project
1-866-488-7386

Alcohol & Drugs

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

National Institute on Drug Abuse

Narcotics Anonymous

Alcoholics Anonymous

Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing (PROP)

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Start Your Recovery

Anxiety Disorders

National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality

Teen’s Health

Anxiety Disorders Association of America

Bipolar Disorder

Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance

National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality

Teen’s Health

Borderline Personality

BPDVideo

National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality

Cutting

Teen’s Health

Self Abuse Finally Ends

Depression

Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance

National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality

Families for Depression Awareness

Teen’s Health

American Psychiatric Foundation

National Alliance on Mental Illness

HeadsUpGuys

Eating Disorders

Teen’s Health

Overeaters Anonymous

National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders

National Eating Disorders Association

Eating Disorders Anonymous

Proud2Bme

Understanding Eating Disorders

Emotional Health

Love is Louder

Half of Us

Veterans United

American Psychiatric Foundation

Active Minds

OK2TALK

Make The Connection

National Dialogue on Mental Health

Each Mind Matters

Befrienders Worldwide

Veterans Affairs Training

Veterans Affairs Mental Health Toolkit

Veterans Affairs Mental Health

Schizophrenia

Schizophrenics Anonymous

Schizophrenia.com

National Alliance on Mental Illness

Stress

Veterans United

Stress Management-HelpGuide.org

Teen’s Health

Suicide Prevention

American Association of Suicidology

Crisis Text Line

The Dougy Center – The National Center for Grieving Children and Families

How to Talk to a Child about a Suicide Attempt in Your Family (Rocky Mountain MIRECC)

The Jason Foundation

The Jed Foundation

Lifeline Chat

Man Therapy

Mental Health America

My3 App

National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention

National Organization for People of Color Against Suicide

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

Now Matters Now

Parents, Families, Friends, and Allies United with LGBTQ People (PFLAG)

Safety Planning Tools

SAVE

The Society for the Prevention of Teen Suicide

StopBullying.gov

Suicide Prevention Resource Center

Teen’s Health

The Trevor Project

The Tyler Clementi Foundation

Veterans Crisis Line

Wounded Warrior Project